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University of Wyoming

Collections

The Rocky Mountain Herbarium (RM) includes the collections of the The U.S. Forest Service Herbarium (USFS) and the Wilhelm G. Solheim Mycological Herbarium (RMS).

The combined holdings of RM/USFS is 825,000 accessions. In addition, there are over 350,000 collections currently under study or in backlog from recent work, bringing the total to more than 1.2 million plant and fungal specimens. RM ranks 17th in the nation and is the largest facility of its kind between St. Louis, Missouri, and Berkeley, California.

Specimen data for RM and USFS are accessible through our online database.

 

Rocky Mountain Herbarium (RM)
The Rocky Mountain Herbarium (RM), founded by Aven Nelson in 1893, contains the largest collection of Rocky Mountain plants in existence with over 700,000 accessions. Other areas of focus include western North America and the northern hemisphere.

 

U.S. Forest Service Herbarium (USFS)
The U.S. Forest Service Herbarium (USFS) was founded by William A. Dayton in 1910 in Washington, D.C. It is presently housed at the RM Herbarium on indefinite loan. With over 120,000 accessions, it is rich in material from national forests throughout the country. USFS type specimens are housed at the Smithsonian Institution (US).

 

Wilhelm G. Solheim Mycological Herbarium (RMS)
The Wilhelm G. Solheim Mycological Herbarium (RMS) contains over 48,000 specimens from around the world. It covers both fleshy fungi (e.g., mushrooms, puffballs, truffles) and parasitic ones (e.g., rusts, smuts, powdery mildews). A mycological reference library is housed with the collection.

Using the Collections

The collections are available for research use. Researchers should make arrangements for access prior to visiting in order to assure that adequate workspace is available. If specimens are being brought into the herbarium, these should be shipped far enough in advance to allow a minimum of 48 hours in the freezer. First-time visitors to the Herbarium must request an orientation.

For further information, please refer to our herbarium policies and information for visitors.


Photo: Geum rossii, northern New Mexico